Norco Addiction Symptoms, Signs & Side Effects

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Norco has a wide variety of side effects. Its misuse can lead to dependence and addiction. People addicted to Norco can show general signs of drug addiction as well as behaviors related to opioid use.

Norco contains hydrocodone, an opioid that attaches to receptors throughout the central nervous system. The presence of hydrocodone makes Norco addictive. Long-term misuse of Norco can create lasting mental and physical side effects.

Medical detox is often used to treat Norco addiction safely. Following detox, a combination of prescribed medication and continued support can help maintain a successful recovery.

Side Effects of Norco

Used as prescribed, Norco is used to relieve chronic and severe pain. Consuming the drug can create feelings of pleasure and euphoria, which is why some people use it recreationally. The more the drug is misused, the more likely a person’s tolerance to the drug increases, potentially resulting in dependence and addiction developing.

The side effects of consuming Norco will vary because people have unique physical and mental compositions. Some general Norco side effects include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Nausea
  • Digestive issues, such as constipation
  • Slowed breathing
  • Dry mouth
  • Back pain
  • Sleeping issues
  • Shakiness
  • Swelling in the lower body
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Tightened muscles
  • Headaches

 

When taken with alcohol, Norco use can slow a person’s heart rate and breathing to dangerous levels. This slowdown can lead to coma and death. During pregnancy, consuming Norco use can cause a low birth weight, neonatal abstinence syndrome or a miscarriage.

Long-Term Side Effects of Norco Use

Tolerance, dependence and addiction are the main side effects of long-term Norco use. Opioids cause brain abnormalities and create dangerous withdrawals, which is why people often struggle to end their usage and opt to continue seeking more. Continued long-term misuse can lead to:

  • Digestive issues, including vomiting, nausea, cramps and bloating
  • Sleeping disorders, such as sleep apnea, ataxic breathing and hypoxemia
  • Respiratory depression
  • Heart failure
  • Dizziness and sedation
  • Excessive pain sensitivity
  • Increased fall risk, leading to bone fractures
  • Decreased hormone levels, leading to sexual dysfunction, infertility, fatigue and lowered testosterone and estrogen amounts

Signs of Norco Abuse

Norco addiction signs are very similar to signs of general drug addiction. People suffering from addiction will often undergo drastic changes in behavior, mood and personality. In addition to the side effects of Norco use, there are a few typical signs to look out for:

  • Loss of interest in hobbies
  • Changes in eating habits
  • Sudden mood swings
  • Problems at school or work
  • Issues with family, friends and loved ones
  • Strange or inconsistent sleep schedule
  • Hygiene problems
  • Sadness or depression
  • Hyperactive or euphoric behavior
  • Erratic speech

If you or a loved one live with a substance use disorder, involving Norco or otherwise, reach out to The Recovery Village Columbus today. Using individualized treatment programs in safe, supportive environments, The Recovery Village Columbus helps patients address their addiction and any co-occurring mental health disorders. Begin your healthier future today.

 

Sources:

Baldini, AnGee. “A Review of Potential Adverse Effects of Long-Term Opioid Therapy: A Practitioner’s Guide.” National Institutes of Health, June 14, 2012. Accessed April 10, 2019.

Kosten, Thomas R. “The Neurobiology of Opioid Dependence: Implications for Treatment.” National Institutes of Health, July 2002. Accessed April 10, 2019.

MedlinePlus. “Hydrocodone.” March 15, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2019.National Institute on Drug Abuse. “What are some signs and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem?” August 2018. Accessed April 10, 2019.

Medical Disclaimer: The Recovery Village Columbus aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.