Understanding Percocet Addiction

The Recovery VillageDrug Rehab

Woman lying down appearing sad.

Percocet is a type of painkiller that many people use to alleviate severe pain. Whether from an injury, chronic medical issue, or surgery, some pain can be so intense that traditional over-the-counter medication simply does not work. In these cases, physicians may prescribe much stronger medications like Percocet in order to help mask the pain.

Unfortunately, Percocet can be highly addictive. This type of medication contains oxycodone and acetaminophen, the former of which is a potent opioid. In addition to reducing pain, opioids like Percocet activate the reward center in the brain and can even alter the reward center pathways. In this way, Percocet can induce feelings of pleasure that patients can easily become addicted to achieving.

With continued use, the effects of Percocet can diminish, requiring more of the medication to obtain the same experience. Fortunately, there are many Ohio addiction treatment resources available to help those battling an addiction to Percocet and eliminate the nasty side effects of prolonged drug use.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Percocet Addiction?

In order to decipher whether or not someone is addicted to Percocet, it is helpful to understand the side effects of Percocet abuse, which can include:

  • Constipation
  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Mood swings
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Sleeping too much
  • Excessive sweating
  • Lack of coordination
  • Reduced blood pressure
  • Slowed breathing
  • Excitability

People who may be suffering from an addiction to Percocet may also give off social clues. For starters, they will do whatever they can to obtain the drug if they are unable to get it from their physician through a prescription. People with a Percocet addiction may resort to stealing medication from anyone they may be in contact with, including friends, family, and even people they do not know.

Blue pill pack.

People who are addicted to Percocet will go to extremes to get their hands on the drug, which is a telltale sign of addiction.

It is not uncommon for people who abuse Percocet to lie about losing their medication and ask for a new prescription to be filled in its place. They may even go so far as to “doctor shop” in order to get prescriptions filled by other physicians who may not be aware of the previously filled prescriptions for Percocet.

What Are the Long-Term Effects of Percocet Addiction?

Percocet users who consume the drug over a long period of time may experience serious medical complications as a result of addiction. As a person becomes addicted to Percocet, he or she may be unwilling to go a day without it. The body and brain will need Percocet in order to function properly, and quitting “cold turkey” can produce extremely uncomfortable and painful withdrawal symptoms.

People with a Percocet addiction are at an increased risk of developing long-term effects on the body, including the following:

  • Kidney failure
  • Liver disease
  • Infections
  • Respiratory issues
  • Overdose and death

Considering the effects of Percocet addiction, seeking help from a reputable Ohio addiction treatment facility is highly recommended.

Where Can Those with a Percocet Addiction Go For Help?

Percocet addiction may have wreaked havoc on your health and your life, but there is help available to help you overcome your addiction. Treatment for Percocet addiction typically includes the administration of appropriate medications, counseling sessions, and educational programs.

At a reputable Ohio addiction treatment center, you can safely eliminate Percocet from your system, learn the skills needed to cope with pain and discomfort without powerful opiates, and start building the foundation for a better life without the dependence on Percocet or other opioids like it.

Contact us to find out more about treatment centers available to you.

 

Medical Disclaimer: The Recovery Village Columbus aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.