Kratom Treatment & Rehab

Kratom is a drug that comes from a plant called Mitragyna speciosa. Since the drug is legal, some people turned to using kratom to take advantage of its stimulant and euphoric properties.

Kratom use is now more common in the United States than ever before. Since kratom has certain desirable effects, such as a stimulant effect and a euphoric effect, it does have the potential for abuse and addiction. The effects of kratom are usually a stimulant effect at low doses and an opioid-like effect at higher doses. Both aspects of kratom use can lend themselves to addiction, especially with frequent or long-term use.

Understanding Kratom Abuse

Based on a report from the CDC, from 2010 to 2015 the number of calls to poison centers across the United States regarding kratom exposure increased about 10 times, from about 26 in 2010 to 263 in 2015.

Although kratom dependence and addiction are not yet well understood, someone who is addicted may display signs similar to other substance addictions, including:

  • Lower performance at school or work
  • Frequent kratom use
  • Social issues or withdrawal from social activity
  • Desire to get more kratom, no matter what else is going on in their life
  • Being secretive about kratom use
  • Hiding kratom use from others
  • Personality changes
  • Continuing use despite negative effects
  • Inability to quit using kratom, even though they may want to quit

Kratom Withdrawal Treatment

Treatment for kratom withdrawal is often similar to that of opioid withdrawal, as the body undergoes a detox process once the drug is removed from the system. Detox takes place during the time the substance leaves the body until none or very little of the drug remains.

During detox, it is common to experience withdrawal symptoms because the body grew used to the drug, and is now suddenly without the drug. This can also occur with kratom detox, especially in people who have used kratom for long periods.

Common symptoms of kratom withdrawal include:

  • Anxiety
  • Cravings
  • Agitation
  • Insomnia
  • Sweating
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain

Kratom Addiction Treatment

As kratom is a much newer drug in the United States compared to many opioid medications, the study of its addiction and treatment is just in the initial phases. Kratom addiction is in many ways similar to opioid addiction, so treatment can be very similar.

A supervised detox program can help aid in the discomfort of withdrawal, stabilization after long-term drug use and transitioning to a treatment program that works for the patient. Many people struggling with addiction have problems with more than one substance and may have mental health concerns as well, such as anxiety or depression. Understanding these individual variables can help patients achieve success in recovery, so seeking assistance from professional rehab centers can be very beneficial.

Find Kratom Rehab in Ohio

If you know someone who is dealing with kratom addiction, The Recovery Village Columbus can assist with a safe and effective recovery process. Contact The Recovery Village Columbus today to speak with a representative to learn how professional addiction treatment can help you achieve a healthier future.

Sources:

National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Kratom.” April 2019. Accessed May 5, 2019.

Anwar, Mehruba. “Notes from the Field: Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) Exposures Reported to Poison Centers — United States, 2010–2015.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 29, 2016. Accessed May 5, 2019.

O’Malley Olsen, Emily. “Notes from the Field: Unintentional Drug Overdose Deaths with Kratom Detected — 27 States, July 2016–December 2017.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 12, 2019. Accessed May 5, 2019.

Medical Disclaimer: The Recovery Village Columbus aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.