Is Neurofeedback an Effective Tool For Addiction Recovery?

The Recovery VillageAddiction

Lit up brain

Addiction afflicts millions of people, and it is something that can be extremely difficult to overcome on your own. Without timely treatment, those who deal with addiction can become lost in their drug or alcohol misuse and even lose their lives as a result. That is why treatment is so important.

Treatment, however, does not always result in immediate success. In fact, recurrence of use is common, even among those who have gone through and completed a treatment program.

The good news is that you do not necessarily have to just accept the possibility of a recurrence of use. Instead, there may be ways to avoid it, and neurofeedback may be one of them.

What Is Neurofeedback?

Neurofeedback is a specific technique that involves training people to modify their brain wave patterns. By doing so, they may be able to achieve a more relaxed and calmer state and reduce feelings of stress. Also known as “brainwave biofeedback,” this particular technique has been shown to be successful in helping to reduce the chances of relapsing in those who have gone through or continue to go through addiction treatment.

Pills and booze

Neurofeedback is an interesting concept for potential use in addiction treatment because it helps people regain control over their emotions.

The process involves the placement of electrodes on a patient’s head to track their electrical brain activity. This data is then reported back to the patient’s brain through either auditory or visual input, like sounds, colors, games or videos. After this feedback is provided to the person, self-regulation can occur.

Biofeedback helps the brain see what it is actually doing and helps it achieve a more homeostatic state. Biofeedback works because the brain actually looks for feedback to balance or regulate itself.

The brain is a naturally self-regulating system, but if the brain and body are immersed in an unhealthy environment, self-regulation becomes more challenging. With the intervention of neurofeedback, the process of self-regulation can be moved along more quickly, allowing the healing from addiction to be much more effective.

Neurofeedback is thought to increase the chances of success of addiction treatment. When combined with other treatments methods, the odds of patients finding ways to successfully manage addiction can be much higher.

This technique can help patients detox, deal with underlying trauma and stay motivated to stay sober. It can also help patients be more present and mindful, while also helping them to develop better sleep patterns, which is crucial to successful addiction recovery and overall well-being.

Training the brain in this manner is an innovative approach that appears to show promise in the world of addiction treatment. By learning to self-regulate by reducing stress, increasing focus and overriding negative thoughts that are often associated with addiction, patients with a substance use disorder may be better able to manage their addiction and curb their desire to reach for drugs or alcohol.

Seek Rehab When Necessary

There are several proven treatment methods that can help people who experience substance use disorders better manage their addictions and get into active recovery. There is help available at Ohio addiction treatment centers, and representatives are waiting to take your call. Contact The Recovery Village Columbus and take a strong step toward a life free from the damaging effects of substance use disorders.

Medical Disclaimer: The Recovery Village Columbus aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.